According to new report by MarketsandMarkets, the Display Materials Market is projected to cross $50.63 Billion by 2020

The market of consumer electronics display products is thriving, currently, and is expected to grow further, with the advancements in the display material technologies. Products such as smart phones, laptops, tablets, and TVs are garnering a very high demand from the consumers’ perspective; this demand directly impacts the ever-increasing demand for the materials associated with these products. There are various materials that are incorporated into the display panels, which contribute to the diverse features of the display, such as defining the display’s resolution, feasibility, resistance to temperature and moisture, aspect ratio, thickness, and the likes. The report describes the materials with respect to the components that are used in the display panels. The display materials that are used in the display panels can be stated as electrode materials, substrate materials, and encapsulation materials.

The analysis shows that the total display materials market is projected to reach market revenue worth $50.63 billion by 2020. In terms of the technological segments, materials for TFT-LCD displays accounted for the largest market revenue, worth $25.00 billion, while materials for plasma displays accounted for the least market share, in 2012. Moreover, OLED display materials market is expected to grow at the highest CAGR from 2012 to 2020.In terms of the application segment, materials in conventional application sector accounted for the largest market revenue, while materials in the ‘transparent application’ sector recorded the least market revenue, in 2012. The APAC region commanded the largest market share in terms of revenue. However, Asia-Pacific and ROW are likely to grow at the highest CAGR.

WWF International Critical Materials for the Transition to a 100% Sustainable Energy Future

The most critical supply bottlenecks of non-energy raw materials are lithium and cobalt, which are used for batteries in electric vehicles. These bottlenecks can be alleviated by recycling lithium, substituting lithium in other sectors, and by using less cobalt-intensive cathodes.

By contrast indium, gallium and tellurium are not expected to become important bottlenecks.

Full report in PDF format here: wwf critical materials report 2014

New Indium Transistor Researched for Low Power Mobile Use

A new type of transistor that could make possible fast and low-power computing devices for energy-constrained applications such as smart sensor networks, implantable medical electronics and ultra-mobile computing is feasible, according to Penn State researchers. Called a near broken-gap tunnel field effect transistor (TFET), the new device uses the quantum mechanical tunneling of electrons through an ultrathin energy barrier to provide high current at low voltage.

Tunnel field effect transistors are considered to be a potential replacement for current CMOS transistors, as device makers search for a way to continue shrinking the size of transistors and packing more transistors into a given area. The main challenge facing current chip technology is that as size decreases, the power required to operate transistors does not decrease in step. The results can be seen in batteries that drain faster and increasing heat dissipation that can damage delicate electronic circuits. Various new types of transistor architecture using materials other than the standard silicon are being studied to overcome the power consumption challenge.

“This transistor has previously been developed in our lab to replace MOSFET transistors for logic applications and to address power issues,” said lead author and Penn State graduate student Bijesh Rajamohanan. “In this work we went a step beyond and showed the capability of operating at high frequency, which is handy for applications where power concerns are critical, such as processing and transmitting information from devices implanted inside the human body.”

For implanted devices, generating too much power and heat can damage the tissue that is being monitored, while draining the battery requires frequent replacement surgery. The researchers, led by Suman Datta, professor of electrical engineering, tuned the material composition of the indium gallium arsenide/gallium arsenide antimony so that the energy barrier was close to zero—or near broken gap, which allowed electrons to tunnel through the barrier when desired.



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